Disorderly Conduct Bail Bonds

DISORDERLY CONDUCT BAIL BONDS

Disorderly conduct can happen anywhere, anytime and to anyone on Earth. Sometimes it is between friends, family, spouses, children, and occasionally complete strangers. Disorderly conduct is defined as when a person intends to annoy, alarm, or inconvenience another person. Some ways this can be done are by fighting or threatening behavior, offensive or disruptive conduct, annoying or interfering with another person, unreasonable noise is being made, disturbing a lawful assembly of a group of people, obstructing pedestrian, or vehicle traffic, refuse to disperse from an area, tampering with evidence, public intoxication, and simple trespassing. As you can see, there are numerous offenses that can get you a charge of disorderly conduct. The punishment might be more severe if alcohol is involved, which can also be known as public intoxication. Domestic violence plus disorderly conduct will result in an order of protection for the victim against the defendant. This means the guilty party must stay away from their victim. Most of these crimes are considered Class C misdemeanors in Connecticut. Some are Class D felonies. Disorderly conduct is one of the charges that must be proven either by photographic evidence, videos, or actual witnesses to the crime. Atomic Bail Bonds can help you out of this situation. Contact us now at (860) 982-4661.

If you have been warned to move from a specific area by the police and you refuse, you can be charged with disorderly conduct. The refusal to move can include you sitting, standing, or lying down in any public area that obstructs people from getting by. If you block an entrance to a public building, you can be charged with disorderly conduct.

First degree harassment is a Class D felony. When someone purposely harasses another person, threatens to hurt, or kill them and does it via phone, mail, online or any other form of communication, that is a felony. If you have been arrested for this charge, the judge may order a psychiatric evaluation for you to determine if you are capable to stand trial or if you may have an undiagnosed disorder of some kind. Second degree harassment is a Class C misdemeanor. It is less than first degree harassment because it does not involve threats of harm or death. With this charge, a psychiatric evaluation may also be ordered.

In Connecticut, hunting is a sport loved by many people. There are certain times and days that you can hunt and keep certain animals. For example, deer season. Every hunter knows the laws regarding hunting deer. If you are following the laws perfectly and someone else is trying to stop you from taking your legal deer, they can be charged with disorderly conduct because they are interfering with a legal activity. When someone purposely scares the hunted animal away, that is also another way to get charged with disorderly conduct.

A Class A misdemeanor disorderly conduct charge can be brought against you if you interfere with someone that is attempting to call 911. If a person is in need of help or is trying to report a crime and another person stops them or attempts to stop them than that is a disorderly conduct charge.

When you interfere with a police officer, you can be found guilty of the crime. Interfering with a police officer can include but not limited to obstructing, resist, hinder or endanger any police officer. This charge is a Class A misdemeanor unless an individual gets harmed or dies. The charge will then be upgraded to a Class D felony.

Interfering with a search warrant is another way to be charged with disorderly conduct. You will face a fine of up to $1,000, one (1) year in jail or both. If you assault with force, resist, oppose, interfere, or intimidate an officer that is serving a search warrant. You are not allowed, by law, to stop that officer when they are searching and retrieving items that pertain to that search warrant. If a weapon is used or harm is done to the officer, you can be fined up to $10,000, ten (10) years in jail, or both! Officers will provide you a copy of the search warrant and it will outline what exactly it is they are looking for and where they are allowed to search. Read it carefully and thoroughly so there is no miscommunication.

Another way you can get a disorderly conduct charge is by destroying property during a seizure by the police officers. It can be destroyed before, during or even after the seizure by the officers. If the police are looking for a specific item and you break, remove, or destroy it, you can be charged! You can also face a fine of up to $1,000, one (1) year in jail or both.

Lockers in the schools used by the children in Connecticut are subject to search by police or school resource officers if there are reasonable grounds suspecting something illegal or unallowable is in that locker at that specific school. The board of education of the schools can and will authorize the search of any locker at any time by law enforcement. They are usually looking for weapons, contraband, stolen items. If you are found to be loitering on school grounds, you will be charged accordingly. Loitering is defined as when a person is on the property of a school and they have no reason to be there. Atomic Bail Bonds can help you if you have a bail bond.

If you have been arrested for disorderly conduct of some kind, you could face up to thirty (30) days in jail, up to a $500 fine or both.

The judge will set your bail bond and let you know of any stipulations that go along with your release. You may have to do a type of class if alcohol was involved in the commission of your disorderly conduct. Defendants can end up with fines, probation, or a combination of the two. Disorderly may not seem like a serious offense to some but the charge can follow you around for years. This can depend on the seriousness of your crime, previous charges and if you have any violations against the victim of your crime. This may lead to difficulties getting and keeping a job, primary or secondary schooling and even housing. Our agents are standing by and are ready to assist you. We will get you back home with your family.

If you have found yourself in jail and have been charged with disorderly conduct, check if you have a bail bond. If you do, contact Atomic Bail Bonds today at (860) 982-4661. Our agents are available and willing to help you out of the situation you are in. We know no one wants to be in jail. We will get you home.

Awesome Image

Speak With Our
Experts Today!

GET A FREE CONSULTATION
Awesome Image