White Collar Crimes Bail Bonds

White Collar Crimes Bail Bonds

White collar crimes can be classified as a crime that involves stealing money from a company by a person that works in a very important role from within that company. The most common white-collar crimes are embezzlement, bribery, bank fraud, blackmail and money laundering. These can also be called elite deviance, corporate crime, occupational crime, respectable crime and upperworld crime. These names come from the fact that the crimes are usually committed by the people that are higher up in the company that have a high social status. These criminals are not treated as such because of their social status. They have the misconception that they are not doing anything wrong. Unfortunately, these crimes do not get reported as much as other crimes do.

Embezzlement is a crime that involves stealing or misappropriating funds that the person is in charge of but that money belongs to the company or the person they work for. In the state of Connecticut, if you are accused of embezzlement you may be charged with larceny. The specific larceny charge depends on the amount that was taken. The state of Connecticut law defines six degrees of larceny as follows: first-degree larceny involves embezzling more than $20,000. This is classified as a Class B felony. You could go to jail from one (1) to twenty (20) years. Second-degree larceny involves embezzling from $10,000 to $20,000. This is classified as a Class C felony and it can carry a jail sentence from one (1) to ten (10) years. Third-degree larceny involves the embezzlement of $2,000 to $10,000. This is a Class D felony that carries a jail sentence of one (1) to five (5) years. Fourth-degree larceny involves the embezzlement of $1,000 to $2,000. This charge is classified as a Class A misdemeanor and it carries a jail sentence of up to one (1) year. Fifth-degree larceny involves the embezzlement of $500 to $1,000 and is considered a Class B misdemeanor. This sentence usually carries a jail sentence of up to six (6) months. Sixth-degree larceny is the embezzlement of $500 or less. This is a Class C misdemeanor and can carry a jail sentence of up to three (3) months. If you are facing this charge and have a bail bond, contact Atomic Bail Bonds now. We can help you.

Bribery is a crime that involves giving something to someone so they will do what you want them to do. It can also be classified as giving or accepting some type of benefit where it violates the power the other person has. Passive bribery is anyone who directly or indirectly gives, offers or promises monetary benefits or anything that is valuable to a person holding a public office position with the intention of getting their private agenda met. Some examples of passive bribery are to influence a public official to participate in any type of fraud against the United States of America or to persuade a public official to overlook a violation that is his or her lawful duty to report. Active bribery is when a public official directly or indirectly demands, pursues, accepts or agrees to accept cash or anything that is valuable, personally for himself or herself. In simpler terms, the United States of America has rules that prohibit anyone giving anything to a government official of any kind in order to get what they want. Bribery is classified as a Class C felony. You can be found guilty of bribery if they promise, propose, discuss or agrees to give a public servant any money or any other valuable items that would influence the decision in favor of the person offering the bribe. A public servant is guilty of a bribe if he or she agrees to accept from another person any money or promises to influence a decision in the favor of the person offering the bribe. If a public servant knows of a bribe and does not report it they can be charged with a Class A misdemeanor and face up to one (1) year in jail. If you are facing this charge and have a bail bond, contact Atomic Bail Bonds now.

Bank fraud is a crime that involves criminally taking money from a bank or a financial institution that you work for. There are two forms of bank fraud that can be broken down into more crimes. The first is when you obtain money, property, or assets of a financial institution through any type of illegal activity. The second is pretending to be a bank, credit union, or other financial institution in order to illegally get money from customers of. Other types of bank fraud can include impersonation of a bank official, money laundering, phishing., stealing checks, forgery, suing fraudulent loans, illegal wire transfers, altering checks and fraudulent accounting practices. All of these crimes are considered a federal crime under the Bank Fraud Statute in Title 18 of the U.S. Code. This statute states the penalties for these crimes in the United States. Such penalties can include a prison sentence of up to thirty (30) years and fees and fines of up to $1,000,000. The penalties that you face for bank fraud will depend on a few different things. The judge will consider the type of fraud you committed, if you have been charged with more crimes related to the fraud and your past criminal history. If you are facing this charge and have a bail bond, contact Atomic Bail Bonds now.

Blackmail, also known as extortion, is a crime that involves demanding payments from another person in order for their secrets to remain a secret by threatening them. The threats can include causing the other person physical harm, physically injuring the other person, damaging their property, expose a secret or expose explicit photos that will damage the other person’s reputation. This is done so damaging information does not get leaked to anyone else. This is classified as a Class B felony. It is classified as Larceny in the first degree. If you have been arrested for blackmail or extortion, you can face up to twenty (20) years in prison, up to $15,000 in fees and fines and also probation. If you are facing this charge and have a bail bond, contact Atomic Bail Bonds now.

Money laundering is a crime that involves you taking money that you have earned unlawfully and running it through legitimate businesses. People do this to hide the fact that the money they have was obtained illegally. A bank employee is presumed to know that the money is from criminal activity if they pay or receive less than face value for the money, know or believe the names are fake, they fail to report or record the transactions or see that they money is not from a known business. Criminals launder their money by making cash deposits into bank accounts that are legitimate. After this is done, the cash that was deposited is turned into money orders, traveler’s checks or wire the money to either another bank or another country. If a bank employee fails to record the transactions, then he or she has laundered money. Federal laws and regulations are in place so that banks keep records of certain transactions over $3,000 and to report all transactions over $10,000, whether they are foreign or domestic, to federal authorities. Any suspicious transactions should also be reported. A person is guilty of first-degree money laundering when they exchange money made from criminal conduct that is valued at more than $10,000 for equivalent property. He or she must intend to conceal that the exchanged property is from the criminal sale of drugs. First-degree money laundering is classified as a Class B felony. If you are facing this charge, you can be sentenced to one (1) to twenty (20) years in prison. A person can be found guilty of money laundering in the second degree if the money is derived from criminal conduct of drug sales as a felony charge. This charge is classified as a Class C felony. You could face from one (1) to ten (10) years in prison. Money laundering in the third degree is classified as a Class D felony. You can face from one (1) to five (5) years in prison. If the money came from criminal activity that is considered a felony and the person knows that their actions will hide the criminal origin, they can be charged with third degree money laundering. Fourth degree money laundering is classified as a Class A misdemeanor. You face up to one (1) year in jail. This means the value is $10,000 or less and the person knows that the exchange will conceal the money’s criminal origin. The fees and fines for all of these charges will not be more than $20,000. However, the court system can make you pay a fine of up to $250,000 or twice the value of the criminally derived instruments, whichever is greater, if this is your first money laundering charge. If this is your second charge or more, you can be fined up to $500,000 or five times the instruments' value. If it is a corporation violating the money laundering law, they are subject to the same fees and fines, but not the extra penalty. If you are facing this charge and have a bail bond, contact Atomic Bail Bondsnow.

If you, a friend or a loved one has been arrested for a white-collar crime in the state of Connecticut, let us help you. Due to the nature of your crime, the judge will have to take many things into consideration. The judge will base his decision off the severity of your crime, if you are a flight risk, if you have ties to the local area and if you work. If you have seen a judge and they have allowed you to be released on a bail bond, contact Atomic Bail Bonds now. Our phone number is (860) 982-4661. Our agents are standing by and ready to help you. We can get you out of jail quickly and back home with your loved ones. You will then be able to work on your case from home. Don’t hesitate. Call Atomic Bail Bonds now.

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